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AUTHOR SUBJECT: Raspberry Pi
Kevin Sweefarend
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Posted: 7/28/2016 12:55:17 PM
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REPLIES:   21

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Posted: 7/28/2016 3:03:40 PM
I have heard of this thing but that's about it...Says it runs Linux.  It is powered by its USB ports.  Uses an SD card instead of a hard drive. Sends video to a TV.  Can do hi def.   Who knows if it's good or not but remember; It costs about $50 and you usually only get what you pay for.  With that in mind, it's probably a fun little toy/hobby for people who want to see if they can make it work. 

THE FILMINATOR
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Posted: 7/31/2016 12:22:38 PM
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Posted: 7/31/2016 6:29:32 PM
Maybe... Check out a company called http://www.gilderfluke.com/ .  They make servo control modules for the industry.  Amusement parks and Hollywood creature creators are amongst their customers.  They also sell "bricks".  With a brick. you can program your robot with a computer then send the data to the brick.  Now you attach the brick to the robot and it will playback the program without needing a computer.

THE FILMINATOR
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Posted: 8/22/2016 1:14:23 AM
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Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 5:03:43 AM
I've heard they were great for some applications, and less great for others. Like CPU-intensive tasks. Editing and rendering video is one of those CPU intensive task. You'd have to install a heatsink and a fan.

The question if a computer can or can't do something today is irrelevant. The real question is: how long can it do something before it melts.  :-)


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Posted: 8/22/2016 5:21:42 AM
I found a magazine at the news stand dedicated to the PI.. I would have picked it up but it was almost $20..... I guess the thing is good for learning and as a hobby but in today's world, isn't it like buying two sticks and trying to find the best way to rub them together to make fire? Just buy a lighter..
Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 5:48:47 AM
Totally agree, James!
I did build my own workstations, back in the days where single processors systems were the standard, but I needed multi processors for editing video. Dual and quad processors systems were in the $25k price range, but buying the parts separately was only $15k. That was around 1998. Not being a computer guru of electronics wizard, it was taking me weeks to get it up and running. It was a fun job to do, challenging, lots of time browsing newsgroups and seeking answers, but it worked, and I saved thousands on a high end system.

And working in a renderless environment was heavenly. Even todays computers and software requires render time. I was renderless in 1998. 8 layers of video with chromakey and color effects, no need for render. It's sad to see manufacturers and developers killed that environment and left editors with the render option only. They monetize on their backs by offering faster software, and selling them faster computers.


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Posted: 8/22/2016 6:03:24 AM
I'm kind of a computer guy.. I use to build them for a living back in 93-96. I built the system I'm using now. It's a double quad-core with lots of RAM and hard drive space. The thing is, I built it almost 7 years ago and it still stands up to today's requirements. Yes. I had to change the video card due to advances in the way polygon images are rendered but besides that, I haven't changes much. I'm getting ready to install new hard drives just for safety sake since the ones I have now are getting old.......... I grew up knowing about Ediflex, a tape based editing solution. You had 8 or 12 VHS machines tried to a controller. Each machine had identical tapes. The system would create offline edits by shuttling through the machines. Lot's of fast forwarding and rewinding and cueing up the next cut. I never experienced the system but I'm guessing you'd have to get use to the noise of all those machines whizzing and winding...
THE FILMINATOR
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Posted: 8/22/2016 6:37:29 AM
Never heard of Ediflex.  You sure it's 90's?  

Can't you plug and play more harddrives? 

 

Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 7:01:48 AM
Ah yes, the A-Roll/B-Roll years! I remember seeing the editing decks days were counted when I saw Commodore's Amiga computers in action in 1992. Real-time video editing on a desktop computer.

Turned out it was the downfall of Commodore computers. They were too good, too powerful, buyers didn't need to buy new ones every year. The market was stolen by other manufacturers with less powerful systems, and their software developers moved to Windows systems. In digital technology, if you want to last long, don't manufacture perfect systems and perfect software. The 'room for improvement' is what keeps you alive, you can claim more money periodically from your users.

Basically that's what made me go back to film stock!!


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Posted: 8/22/2016 7:17:19 AM
I agree that software developers are getting out of hand. Every year they have new upgraded, new versions. Maya is like that. That's the sw I used for CGI. Every stinkin' year they add something useful to the program to prompt you to upgrade. I have no proof but I think they already had next year's upgrade ready when they released this year's version to the market. "hey, this year we will introduce water. Next year we will add features to make it look real. The year after that we will add collisions."............................. Marius, I didn't say Ediflex was from the 90s and I didn't say I was adding extra hard drives.
THE FILMINATOR
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Posted: 8/22/2016 8:00:27 AM
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Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 8:35:09 AM
Hehe here's a short video I made, back in... 1997 I believe. Wow almost 20 years ago. Time sure flies!!
I took care of everything 3D, the ad agency did the editing and added live action footage. That was shown at Michelin's booth during Frankfurt Auto Show in 1998.



THE FILMINATOR
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Posted: 8/22/2016 9:32:40 AM
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Posted: 8/22/2016 10:21:20 AM
Anyone remember the VideoToaster? It was a card that you put in your computer that allowed you to do CGI and other types of graphics. I remember that along with the card, it came with it's own graphics software. Back then I would have given my left nut for a toaster.. All I had was my 486 computer and 3D Studios. Back then, the program could not even do deformable skin. Everything was "flying logo" work... I cut my teeth on that program.. So much fun.
Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 10:22:26 AM
I admit the speech makes it sound pretty presumptuous, but hey it was a sales pitch to car manufacturers. I guess they needed to sound like "We are the future".
We're still waiting for that future. Haha!

Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 10:36:29 AM
I worked on Video Toaster for years. A dream station indeed. The complete Toaster suite was VTEdit, LightWave, Aura, and a bunch of video utilities. Everything was there. Actually the video I posted above is all Video Toaster content.

The company is still around, but they don't focus a lot on software anymore. They manufacture the TriCaster line, integrated turnkey live broadcast boxes.

TriCaster website.

Here's LightWave 2015 demo. The software seems pretty powerful now! Around 2008, I think, they were introducing dynamics, collision detection, radiosity and a bunch of amazing features.



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Posted: 8/22/2016 11:00:52 AM
People in the CGI world say that Maya is designed for technically minded people while Lighwave is designed for artists. It's said that you can essentially do the same thing with both. I think the advantage that Maya has is that it has it's own programming language that allows you to get under the hood and customize/program it to do what you need. I mean you can program animations to behave in any way you can come up with.... But let's not forget the unsung hero in a lot of these amazing shots; the composite artist. This is the person who takes the elements and makes them look like they belong... I use Fusion64.. Love it!!
Sv Bell | Black Flag Pictures
Sv+Bell
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Posted: 8/22/2016 11:11:37 AM
As Discreet said in their ads: compositing is everything!
I've never used Maya - barely scratched the surface of a demo version, but it's right, Lightwave is built by artists, for artists. It's very intuitive and easy to use. I started 3D with 3DS R4, running on DOS. Very powerful, but very parametric. It was obviously made by programmers, not artists. When they came up with 3DS Max, it was already an improvement.

Much like Maya's MEL language, LightWave had its own scripting language, the LWScript.

For my compositing work, I still rely on Shake. Apple discontinued it in 2010 I believe, but it's still an amazing compositing software. It's node-based too, I love it! Why aren't all softwares node-based?!

THE FILMINATOR
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Posted: 8/22/2016 11:13:43 AM
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Posted: 8/22/2016 11:35:29 AM
I agree; node based makes perfect sense. Layers makes no sense to me at all. ........... Fusion is powerful and was easy to figure out upon first use.. NukeX may be the be leading compositing package out there today but it's not as intuitive as Fusion. It takes a little getting use to. Fusion and NukeX are used by major FX houses.
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